Transitions

I started my fundraising career at age 13, raising money for a 24-hour world hunger awareness fast held at my junior high. I took to the task of getting sponsors with gusto, not because I was excited about fasting for 24 hours, but because I believed in what we were doing.

31 years later I am back in a fundraising role as the new Development Director for Kingdom Causes Bellflower. The circumstances have changed a bit, as has my understanding of the world around me. While there are still people in faraway lands that need help, there are also brothers and sisters in our neighborhoods that need to feel the love of Christ.

What hasn’t changed is that fundraising is so much easier when you truly believe in the cause.

After nine years on the Board of Directors and five years as President, I felt like it was time to step away. There were other people who were capable of leading, and every organization can benefit from a different perspective from time to time. Serving on the board was an amazing and challenging experience, as we prayed many prayers of “give us today our daily bread.” KCB has been blessed by so much support from the community over the years, but I can honestly say that we have never experienced sustained comfort from a financial standpoint. Perhaps that is part of task of remaining faithful to the work of loving others. When we are unable to get comfortable from the standpoint of worldly wealth, it keeps us focused on the reality of daily needs in our community. Looking back, I have been reminded constantly that humility is part of the journey for all of us.

The stories are endless. Some stories have been heart-wrenching, while others have brought tears of joy. People are complicated and lives are messy. That is a constant, and something that will always be a part of our work.

I find it fascinating how God equips people for certain tasks. Most people I encounter don’t love to raise funds, and writing grants does not exactly cause others to covet my small role in the organization. For whatever reason, I enjoy both. Maybe it is because both functions provide an opportunity to tell some amazing stories of transformation.

In the coming weeks, I will share more of my experiences and perspectives as I tell the story of KCB to a broader audience. In the meantime, I encourage you to think about your role in your local community. The functional elements of my job focus on the financial realities of sustaining a non-profit organization, but I don’t just want your wallet. More importantly, I ask you consider giving your time and your heart.

KCB has been blessed with the opportunity to bring together a lot of amazing people over the last ten years. Much progress has been made, but the work continues. I look forward to finding a way for you to join us in this journey.